Lower Back Pain

  • LBP Syndrome; Herniated disc; Degenerative disc disease;
  • Pre and post operative spinal rehabilitation,
  • Sciatica / HNP; Pinched nerves; Radiculopathy
  • Spinal manipulative therapy
  • Computerized spinal traction
  • Back school education classes

Herniated Disk

herniated_disk LUMBARA herniated disk refers to a problem with one of the rubbery cushions (disks) between the individual bones (vertebrae) that stack up to make your spine.

A spinal disk is a little like a jelly donut, with a softer center encased within a tougher exterior. Sometimes called a slipped disk or a ruptured disk, a herniated disk occurs when some of the softer “jelly” pushes out through a crack in the tougher exterior.

A herniated disk can apply pressure and cause irritation to nearby nerves and result in pain, numbness or weakness in an arm or leg. On the other hand, many people experience no symptoms from a herniated disk. Many people who have a herniated disk respond well to physical therapy management, sometimes combined with spinal epidural injections, thus avoiding surgery to correct the problem. When surgery is necessary, post-operative physical therapy is an important part of recovery.

Kyphosis

KyphosisKyphosis is a forward rounding of your upper back. Some rounding is normal, but the term “kyphosis” usually refers to an exaggerated rounding – sometimes called round back or hunchback. While kyphosis can occur at any age, it’s most common in older women where the deformity is known as a dowager’s hump. Age-related kyphosis often occurs after osteoporosis weakens spinal bones to the point that they crack and compress. A few types of kyphosis target infants or teens.

Mild kyphosis may cause few problems. But advanced or severe cases can affect your lungs, nerves, and other tissues and organs, causing pain and other problems. Treatment for kyphosis depends on your age, the cause of the curvature and its effects. Physical therapy can help many cases through pain management, increased flexibility through manual therapeutic techniques and postural correction.

An exaggerated outward curve of the upper spine is called kyphosis.

Scoliosis

ScoliosisScoliosis is a sideways curvature of the spine that occurs most often during the growth spurt just before puberty. While scoliosis can be caused by conditions such as cerebral palsy and muscular dystrophy, the cause of most scoliosis is unknown. Most cases of scoliosis are mild, but some children develop spine deformities that continue to get more severe as they grow. Severe scoliosis can be disabling. An especially severe spinal curve can reduce the amount of space within the chest, making it difficult for the lungs to function properly.

Children who have mild scoliosis are monitored closely, usually with X-rays, to see if the curve is getting worse. In many cases, no treatment is necessary. Some children will need to wear a brace to stop the curve from worsening. Physical therapy in the form of focused flexibility and strengthening exercises, combined with postural correction is often helpful in younger patients. Others may need surgery to keep the scoliosis from worsening and to straighten severe cases of scoliosis.

Sacroiliitis

Sacroiliitis (say-kroe-il-e-I-tis) is an inflammation of one or both of your sacroiliac joints – the places where your lower spine and pelvis connect. Sacroiliitis can cause pain in your buttocks or lower back, and may even extend down one or both legs. The pain associated with sacroiliitis is often aggravated by prolonged standing or by stair climbing.

Sacroiliac jointSacroiliitis can be difficult to diagnose, because it may be mistaken for other causes of low back pain. It’s been linked to a group of diseases that cause inflammatory arthritis of the spine. Treatment of sacroiliitis may involve a combination of rest, physical therapy and medications.

The sacroiliac joints link your pelvis and lower spine. They’re made up of the sacrum – the bony structure above your tailbone and below your lower vertebrae – and the top part (ilium) of your pelvis. There are sacroiliac joints in both the right and left sides of your lower back. Strong ligaments hold these joints in place. The sacroiliac joints support the weight of your upper body when you stand.

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